Day Two – and Three – and Four…

We had a calm night chugging up the Eastern Coast of England and woke to find ourselves level with Middlesborough. During the morning the sea became rougher but we managed to give our talk without too much staggering – we did the Crucible and thought it went down OK, sighed with relief and thought we had two days off. We had put on our gladrags to go to the Captains cocktail party in the evening, when we met the Cruise Director coming up the stairs – she said ‘There is a possibility that it might be too rough to go ashore tomorrow – Don’t Tell Anyone – you might have to do another lecture tomorrow’ She said that we should have had a note in our cabin – we eventually got said note after it had been delivered to two other passengers – so much for secrecy!
Indeed – the wind it did roar, and the waves they did swell, and it became mighty rocky. It was great! We couldn’t stop at the Shetlands, wlthough we saw them from afar –

It was a sensible decision as it was a port where you had to go ashore by tender – small boat tied up alongside – and I wouldn’t have fancied hopping from one boat to another in the thirty feet waves!
We gave Last of the Mohicans as our talk – it wasn’t the best performance as the floor was moving around a bit, and I panicked and went too fast and Phil thought what the hell is she doing and talked very slowly.
Afterwards a man came up and said ‘Your research doesn’t coincide with mine’ – his research consisting of knowing a man who once lived in Boston who thought that the Indians were civilised. I politely pointed out that the parts he was disagreeing with were actual quotes from the author of the book but he wasn’t convinced.
Ah, well, some you win, some you lose.
We went out on deck to watch the waves – it was so beautiful – it was very windy, and the wind blew gusts of spray from the crests of the waves which the sun shone through and you could see rainbows over the sea.

Both days had been a force 7 gale – A lot of people were sick – but luckily I obviously have the constitution of a whale as well as the bodily structure.
It had calmed down by the time we had got to the Faroes and we anchored at Torshaven.

It is a tiny little port – don’t know that I would like to live there – or even splash out on an airfare to go back – but it was lovely to walk around. The houses around the old part of the port had grass roofs (why do you have hoof and hooves – and not roof and rooves?)

We found a yarn shop where I bought Faroes wool, in dark brown and cream – not sure what I will make yet but the man said that it was enough for a jumper for Phil.
We also found a peaceful graveyard right in the (dead) centre of town – I love wandering around graveyards reading the epitaphs and looking at the different types of tombstones.

We found one of the ugliest buildings in the world – is it a tenet of the Catholic Church that they only employ Really Bad Architects?

Walked up to a viewpoint and saw a cat waiting to pounce on a mouse – but we weren’t as patient as the cat and went and sat and looked over the town – it was very peaceful and calm – just the sound of someone hammering down in the streets. There is nothing as good as listening to the sound of someone else working when you have absolutely nothing to do!

Walked back down past this sculpture – the chap in the middle insisted on coming back with me.

We wandered around looking for a bar, but only found a cafe, which, although it sold beer, had all the atmosphere of Hull Kardomah. ( And where that memory popped up from only a qualified psychologist could comment)
During the time in the bar I started to worry that I wouldn’t have enough wool to cover Phil with – so went back and bought some more – thereby possibly condemning whole family to rough brown socks or those hats that look like helmets – but better safe than sorry.(says she badly scarred by trying to get some sort of wearable garment out of lovely alpaca which I was too tight to buy enough for the larger size that I so obviously am)
Back to the ship for 1600 and a 1700 sailing.
No Sailaway cocktail or parties like on the Saga – possibly because it was so %£%$” cold – but not as much fun! To make up for that though – the scenery was fantastic – sailing out through the Faroe Islands when the sun was setting was just so beautiful.

One more for luck.

Day Two – and Three – and Four…

We had a calm night chugging up the Eastern Coast of England and woke to find ourselves level with Middlesborough. During the morning the sea became rougher but we managed to give our talk without too much staggering – we did the Crucible and thought it went down OK, sighed with relief and thought we had two days off. We had put on our gladrags to go to the Captains cocktail party in the evening, when we met the Cruise Director coming up the stairs – she said ‘There is a possibility that it might be too rough to go ashore tomorrow – Don’t Tell Anyone – you might have to do another lecture tomorrow’ She said that we should have had a note in our cabin – we eventually got said note after it had been delivered to two other passengers – so much for secrecy!
Indeed – the wind it did roar, and the waves they did swell, and it became mighty rocky. It was great! We couldn’t stop at the Shetlands, wlthough we saw them from afar –

It was a sensible decision as it was a port where you had to go ashore by tender – small boat tied up alongside – and I wouldn’t have fancied hopping from one boat to another in the thirty feet waves!
We gave Last of the Mohicans as our talk – it wasn’t the best performance as the floor was moving around a bit, and I panicked and went too fast and Phil thought what the hell is she doing and talked very slowly.
Afterwards a man came up and said ‘Your research doesn’t coincide with mine’ – his research consisting of knowing a man who once lived in Boston who thought that the Indians were civilised. I politely pointed out that the parts he was disagreeing with were actual quotes from the author of the book but he wasn’t convinced.
Ah, well, some you win, some you lose.
We went out on deck to watch the waves – it was so beautiful – it was very windy, and the wind blew gusts of spray from the crests of the waves which the sun shone through and you could see rainbows over the sea.

Both days had been a force 7 gale – A lot of people were sick – but luckily I obviously have the constitution of a whale as well as the bodily structure.
It had calmed down by the time we had got to the Faroes and we anchored at Torshaven.

It is a tiny little port – don’t know that I would like to live there – or even splash out on an airfare to go back – but it was lovely to walk around. The houses around the old part of the port had grass roofs (why do you have hoof and hooves – and not roof and rooves?)

We found a yarn shop where I bought Faroes wool, in dark brown and cream – not sure what I will make yet but the man said that it was enough for a jumper for Phil.
We also found a peaceful graveyard right in the (dead) centre of town – I love wandering around graveyards reading the epitaphs and looking at the different types of tombstones.

We found one of the ugliest buildings in the world – is it a tenet of the Catholic Church that they only employ Really Bad Architects?

Walked up to a viewpoint and saw a cat waiting to pounce on a mouse – but we weren’t as patient as the cat and went and sat and looked over the town – it was very peaceful and calm – just the sound of someone hammering down in the streets. There is nothing as good as listening to the sound of someone else working when you have absolutely nothing to do!

Walked back down past this sculpture – the chap in the middle insisted on coming back with me.

We wandered around looking for a bar, but only found a cafe, which, although it sold beer, had all the atmosphere of Hull Kardomah. ( And where that memory popped up from only a qualified psychologist could comment)
During the time in the bar I started to worry that I wouldn’t have enough wool to cover Phil with – so went back and bought some more – thereby possibly condemning whole family to rough brown socks or those hats that look like helmets – but better safe than sorry.(says she badly scarred by trying to get some sort of wearable garment out of lovely alpaca which I was too tight to buy enough for the larger size that I so obviously am)
Back to the ship for 1600 and a 1700 sailing.
No Sailaway cocktail or parties like on the Saga – possibly because it was so %£%$” cold – but not as much fun! To make up for that though – the scenery was fantastic – sailing out through the Faroe Islands when the sun was setting was just so beautiful.

One more for luck.

Life on the High Seas – The First Day.


Jake took Phil and I down to Dover, and to the Cruise terminal, which is in the old railway station -a fantastic building. There was a queue of cars waiting to unload bags, and to park. When we got to a porter, he was so efficient that, as I was fussing over my farewells to my darling younger son (remember to feed chickens, cats, self – wash – don’t burn house down etc etc) he took every case and bag – including the hand luggage which I hadn’t bothered to label at all – it being hand luggage.
We went up to the passenger check in, didn’t know which queue to join, so Phil went back downstairs and we were let in through the crew entrance – and went and found our cabin. Very nice – port hole and on the fourth floor.
There was a letter waiting for us which spelt out our duties for the coming weeks – we had to give a lecture every sea day at 11, so we thought we knew where we were and what we were doing. There was also a list of 17 Rules – including ‘It is not permitted for cabaret and lecturers to sit together in groups of more than four per table …(tough on the Osmonds or the Jackson Five)’ Swimming pool areas are exclusively for guest use only … Do not discuss company business, politics or religion with guests (goodbye half our lecture content!)and Caberet artists and lecturers cannot join in crew parties unless invited (as if we would be so rude as to gatecrash!) So we were firmly put in our place before spending five minutes on board – neither one thing or the other!
We had to go to a meeting with the other ‘artistes’ to meet the management at 1800 – and before that to an emergency drill practise – so our first evening was busy.
Just after the meeting a couple came up to us and introduced themselves, He was Alan Russell who used to be a producer on Blue Peter, and co-incidentally also part owner of the agency who gives us the work – so no pressure there then! He was the celebrity guest lecturer and was going to be giving talks on his life at the BBC.
His wife, Jenny, is lovely. The cruise director then destroyed all plans by saying that she hadn’t drawn up the entertainment plans and would be changing them all, and that Alan Russell had said to her that he didn’t want to lecture at the same time every day, so we would only know when we would be lecturing by reading the next days plans the night before.
We should have sailed at 1700 – but didn’t set off until 20:00 – they were still loading supplies, or oiling the oars or something. So we didn’t get to see the white cliffs slip away in the sunlight.
We managed to track down our unlabelled bags which had been left unattended in the open area of reception – hello again Mothers pearls, camera leads,hard copies of lectures, etc etc.
We had a little tour around the ship, then an earlyish night as we had to lecture the next day so wanted to get some sleep.

Life on the High Seas – The First Day.


Jake took Phil and I down to Dover, and to the Cruise terminal, which is in the old railway station -a fantastic building. There was a queue of cars waiting to unload bags, and to park. When we got to a porter, he was so efficient that, as I was fussing over my farewells to my darling younger son (remember to feed chickens, cats, self – wash – don’t burn house down etc etc) he took every case and bag – including the hand luggage which I hadn’t bothered to label at all – it being hand luggage.
We went up to the passenger check in, didn’t know which queue to join, so Phil went back downstairs and we were let in through the crew entrance – and went and found our cabin. Very nice – port hole and on the fourth floor.
There was a letter waiting for us which spelt out our duties for the coming weeks – we had to give a lecture every sea day at 11, so we thought we knew where we were and what we were doing. There was also a list of 17 Rules – including ‘It is not permitted for cabaret and lecturers to sit together in groups of more than four per table …(tough on the Osmonds or the Jackson Five)’ Swimming pool areas are exclusively for guest use only … Do not discuss company business, politics or religion with guests (goodbye half our lecture content!)and Caberet artists and lecturers cannot join in crew parties unless invited (as if we would be so rude as to gatecrash!) So we were firmly put in our place before spending five minutes on board – neither one thing or the other!
We had to go to a meeting with the other ‘artistes’ to meet the management at 1800 – and before that to an emergency drill practise – so our first evening was busy.
Just after the meeting a couple came up to us and introduced themselves, He was Alan Russell who used to be a producer on Blue Peter, and co-incidentally also part owner of the agency who gives us the work – so no pressure there then! He was the celebrity guest lecturer and was going to be giving talks on his life at the BBC.
His wife, Jenny, is lovely. The cruise director then destroyed all plans by saying that she hadn’t drawn up the entertainment plans and would be changing them all, and that Alan Russell had said to her that he didn’t want to lecture at the same time every day, so we would only know when we would be lecturing by reading the next days plans the night before.
We should have sailed at 1700 – but didn’t set off until 20:00 – they were still loading supplies, or oiling the oars or something. So we didn’t get to see the white cliffs slip away in the sunlight.
We managed to track down our unlabelled bags which had been left unattended in the open area of reception – hello again Mothers pearls, camera leads,hard copies of lectures, etc etc.
We had a little tour around the ship, then an earlyish night as we had to lecture the next day so wanted to get some sleep.